News

Here We Go Again

 

 

On Tuesday, the Alberta Court of Appeal ruled 4-1 that the federal government overstepped its jurisdiction with the Impact Assessment Act - better known as Bill C-69.

The decision is not binding, and the federal government has already announced that they will appeal the decision, meaning that we're headed for another Supreme Court battle between Alberta and Ottawa.

We’ve been here before - the lyrics to Whitesnake’s 1982 hit song, Here I Go Again, come to mind:


Eastern Projects Approved, Western Projects Denied

 

 

Keystone XL? Cancelled.

Energy East? Cancelled.

Northern Gateway? Cancelled.

Teck Resources? Cancelled.

Pretty much anything out east? Approved!


No Confidence, Lots Of Supply

 

 

Last month, Canadians were treated to the news that a new government - one they didn’t elect - had been formed, sort of.

Justin Trudeau and Jagmeet Singh reached a “Confidence and Supply Agreement” that would keep the Liberals in power until 2025, with the NDP backing the government on confidence votes and budgets.

While it's not an official coalition, with the NDP receiving no cabinet minister spots, for the purposes of Alberta, it might as well be.


Real Equality For Provinces

 

 

Last week I wrote to you all about how some provinces are more equal than others when it comes to seats in the House of Commons.

You can refer back to last week's email for the full details, but here's a quick summary:


All Provinces Are Equal, But Some Provinces Are More Equal Than Others

 

 

In the most up-to-date Canadian census data, Quebec's population increased, but it increased more slowly than the rest of the country, meaning Quebec now makes up a smaller share of the total Canadian population.

Who cares about a slightly slower rate of increase in population, you might ask?

Well, politicians in Quebec really do, because a province's population is the primary thing that determines how many seats it gets in the House of Commons, and Quebec's drop in share of population means mathematically it will lose a seat in the next Parliament.


A Fair Deal Includes Energy Security

Energy security.

It's a concept that has been ignored by many - including our federal government in Ottawa - for far too long.

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has suddenly helped the world realize what's been obvious to many Albertans for a long time - we still need oil and gas!


It's Time To Channel Our Anger

 

 

You're mad.

I get it. 

You should be mad.

It's time now, though, to figure out how to channel that anger to create a stronger Alberta.


New Year Update 2022

 

 

I hope you had an enjoyable Christmas and New Year, and that you're having a great 2022 so far.

While our team managed to find a little time to rest, Project Confederation didn't slow down too much over the holidays - there's always plenty of work to be done!

In fact, I even had the honour of being featured in a National Post column addressing the frustrations that we all feel regarding our place in confederation.


All Talk, No Action

 

 

The Alberta Legislature finished for the year on Tuesday and the theme of the session might as well have been "all talk, no action".

Despite wave after wave of relentless attacks from a hostile federal government in Ottawa, precious little progress has been made to stand up for Alberta.

Given Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberal government have their foot on the throat of our energy sector, a strong response from the provincial government should be expected, right?


Time To Stop Appeasing Activists

 

 

Winston Churchill famously criticized appeasers, saying: "each one hopes that if he feeds the crocodile enough, the crocodile will eat him last."

His point was that repeated compromise that allows your opponent to repeatedly shift the goalposts only delays your inevitable demise, rather than preventing it.

If the federal government and environmental radicals are today's crocodiles, and Alberta's energy industry is the meat, why are we still feeding them?